I respect farmers. I feel farming should be one of the most highly esteemed professions in the world. Farmers grow food, and food is life. One of my favorite things is to sit with friends around a meal we have prepared together, with laughter and love, and let the life of the plants on my plate flow through my mind. Memories of the feeling of sunshine, rain, rich soil, breeze, and time imbue my appreciation of their lives. Maybe it is my imagination, or maybe it is something more, but I feel I can feel when a plant has been grown with love, or it has been grown with harsh chemicals, and in burdened or dead soil in those moments I pause to thank them for being my food.

This post is to thank the farmers who love their livlihood, and endeavor to work without harsh chemicals or genetically modified seeds. You are appreciated beyond words. Farming is hard work. So much time and energy goes into growing food, and losing a crop could mean losing one’s farm. It can be very tempting to go the chemical and GMO rout. I cried when I lost my first zucchini plant to cabbage moths. (Side note: I later figured out that you can cut the damaged roots and base off, and bury the vine because it will often grow more roots at the nodes. But that might not be a logical solution for bigger scale farmers.) The point is, thank you farmers who do not succumb. Thank you for finding other solutions. You are loved.

There are three farms I want to acknowledge in this post, and give thanks to your endeavors. You keep my heart happy.

Valhalla
I had to pause at the entrance of this macadamia nut farm because a feeling of pure love enveloped me in a healing hug the moment I stepped on the land. My eyes grew misty in a happy way, which always happens when I feel love. The trees swayed in greeting. To learn more, check out their site.

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Caoba
I wrote about this beautiful, organic farm a few posts ago, so I won’t say too much more now. They also have a website.

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The Lost Farms
News articles and documentaries exist that explain much more in-depth about the intricacies of taking over land. Airborne pollen from GMO plants get into other farms, bacteria-laden seeds murder the soil and make people sick, and other sneaky tricks have forced farmers to lose their farms to certain corporations. This is well-documented, and anyone who says any different is part of the business of misinformation.

I finally met, in person, one of the farmers who lost his farm to that land-hungry corporation. The farmer turned to another profession in order to save money to buy more land to do more farming because he loves working with the land and feeding people. I understand that. I feel most at home when I’m in the garden, my fingers are caked in dirt, and I’m helping plants grow. The farmer I speak of is one of the most amazing, resilliant, friendly, spiritual, community-strengthening, justice-seeking, and generally wonderful people I know. This section is to honor and celebrate him and others who have lost so much, and have found the strength to keep working for what they love.

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